Down the TBR Hole #14 || Book Meme

Hello beautiful people!

Welcome back to another week of Down the TBR Hole, where I painstakingly go through and remove books from my TBR list … since I say I’m going to read them all when in reality … I’m not.

The Creator and the Rules

This was created by Lia @ Lost in a Story — she has a new blog though called Sunflowers and Wonder!

  1. Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf
  2. Order on ascending date added.
  3. Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books.
  4. Read the synopses of the books.
  5. Decide: keep it or should it go?
  6. Keep track of where you left off so you can pick up there next week!

Book #131 | The Story of King Arthur and His Knights by Howard Pyle



Date Added: February 13, 2017

Synopsis: In these wonderfully illustrated tales, renowned storyteller Howard Pyle carries us back to the enchanting world of King Arthur and his Round Table. The book chronicles the adventures of Arthur as he draws the sword Excalibur from the anvil, proving his right to the throne, and as he courts and wins the heart of Guinevere. Later he suffers the treachery of the wicked Morgana le Fay and witnesses the tragic fate of the Enchanter Merlin. In Pyle’s classic retelling, the legends come alive in unsurpassed vividness. More powerful than any of Merlin’s spells, The Story of King Arthur and His Knights has enthralled and delighted generations of readers fascinated by chivalry, magic, and the unforgettable drama of medieval times.

Verdict: KEEP

Book #132 | The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood by Howard Pyle



Date Added: February 13, 2017

Synopsis: The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood of Great Renown in Nottinghamshire is an 1883 novel by the American illustrator and writer Howard Pyle. Consisting of a series of episodes in the story of the English outlaw Robin Hood and his band of Merry Men, the novel compiles traditional material into a coherent narrative in a colorful, invented “old English” idiom that preserves some flavor of the ballads, and adapts it for children. The novel is notable for taking the subject of Robin Hood, which had been increasingly popular through the 19th century, in a new direction that influenced later writers, artists, and filmmakers through the next century […]

Verdict: KEEP

Book #133 | Othello by William Shakespeare



Date Added: February 13, 2017

Synopsis: In Othello, Shakespeare creates a powerful drama of a marriage that begins with fascination (between the exotic Moor Othello and the Venetian lady Desdemona), with elopement, and with intense mutual devotion and that ends precipitately with jealous rage and violent deaths. He sets this story in the romantic world of the Mediterranean, moving the action from Venice to the island of Cyprus and giving it an even more exotic coloring with stories of Othello’s African past. Shakespeare builds so many differences into his hero and heroine—differences of race, of age, of cultural background—that one should not, perhaps, be surprised that the marriage ends disastrously […]

Verdict: KEEP

Book #134 | For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway



Date Added: February 13, 2017

Synopsis: In 1937 Ernest Hemingway traveled to Spain to cover the civil war there for the North American Newspaper Alliance. Three years later he completed the greatest novel to emerge from “the good fight”, For Whom the Bell Tolls

The story of Robert Jordan, a young American in the International Brigades attached to an antifascist guerilla unit in the mountains of Spain, it tells of loyalty and courage, love and defeat, and the tragic death of an ideal […]

Verdict: GO

Book #135 | Good Morning, Midnight by Lily Brooks-Dalton



Date Added: February 14, 2017

Synopsis: Augustine, a brilliant, aging astronomer, is consumed by the stars. For years he has lived in remote outposts, studying the sky for evidence of how the universe began. At his latest posting, in a research center in the Arctic, news of a catastrophic event arrives. The scientists are forced to evacuate, but Augustine stubbornly refuses to abandon his work. Shortly after the others have gone, Augustine discovers a mysterious child, Iris, and realizes that the airwaves have gone silent. They are alone […]

Verdict: GO

Book #136 | The Year We Fell Apart by Emily Martin



Date Added: February 14, 2017

Synopsis: Few things come as naturally to Harper as epic mistakes. In the past year she was kicked off the swim team, earned a reputation as Carson High’s easiest hook-up, and officially became the black sheep of her family. But her worst mistake was destroying her relationship with her best friend, Declan.

Now, after two semesters of silence, Declan is home from boarding school for the summer. Everything about him is different—he’s taller, stronger…more handsome. Harper has changed, too, especially in the wake of her mom’s cancer diagnosis […]

Verdict: GO

Book #137 | Forever, or a Long, Long Time by Caela Carter



Date Added: February 15, 2017

Synopsis: An achingly beautiful story in the vein of Rebecca Stead and R. J. Palacio about two foster children who want desperately to believe that they’ve found their forever home.

Flora and her brother, Julian, don’t believe they were born. They’ve lived in so many foster homes, they can’t remember where they came from. And even now that they’ve been adopted, Flora still struggles to believe in forever. So along with their new mother, Flora and Julian begin a journey to go back and discover their past—for only then can they really begin to build their future.

Verdict: GO

Book #138 | Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry



Date Added: February 16, 2017

Synopsis: Recipient of the Grand Prix of the Académie Française, Wind, Sand and Stars captures the grandeur, danger, and isolation of flight. Its exciting account of air adventure, combined with lyrical prose and the spirit of a philosopher, makes it one of the most popular works ever written about flying. Translated by Lewis Galantière.

Verdict: GO

Book #139 | Night Flight by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry



Date Added: February 16, 2017

Synopsis: In this gripping novel, Saint-Exupéry tells about the brave men who piloted night mail planes from Patagonia, Chile, and Paraguay to Argentina in the early days of commercial aviation. Preface by André Gide. Translated by Stuart Gilbert.

Verdict: GO

Book #140 | The Wisdom of the Sands (Citadelle) by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry



Date Added: February 16, 2017

Synopsis: The final, deeply-felt summing-up of the author’s experience and his philosophy of life. Choosing a desert prince as his protagonist and narrator, he presents the timeless problems of humanity against the austere background of the wilderness. The book abounds in vivid pictures of desert life, forays and sandstorms, mirage-born madness, beleaguered cities, caravans going their perilous ways. It may be read just for the sake of these scenes, so incomparably described, or read as an allegory of man and his grandeur, of his ends and the means that may lead to them and, most clearly of all, of the moral and spiritual values that unite the individual to God.

Verdict: GO

Books Removed in this Post: 7 / 10

Total Books Removed: 82 / 140

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